John Wilcock
Other Scenes

What RFK’s election would prove is that America is further ahead in its cheerfully cynical acceptance of corruption and back-room deals than had been feared...

First winner of the Other Scenes Yellow Journalism Award (“the underground Pulitzer”) is the New York Free Press for its outrageously creative publication of the names, addresses and telephone numbers of local draft board members. Citation of the OSYJ award reads: “In a time when newspapers prefer to follow rather than lead, when the apparent aim is to mollify the advertisers rather than rock the boat, and when most newspapers put the maintenance of the status quo ahead of the best interests of the readers’, the New York Free Press reminds us that traditionally the best newspapers have always been troublemakers. May their example be widely copied”...

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

Editors’ Note: We neglected last issue to welcome John Wilcock back to the pages of this newspaper. John was one of the founders of the Village Voice and the East Village Other. He publishes his own paper, Other Scenes which is a 20 times a year newspaper produced from wherever the editor happens to be. This could be Greece, Japan, England or anywhere else in the world. Subscriptions are $5 and should be sent to OS, Box 8, Village Post Office, N.Y., N.Y. 10014.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

Millbrook, that renowned dropout shrine in upstate New York, is closed and padlocked, its tribe scattered, its guru Tim Leary now living in Berkeley. And the end of an era was marked last month with a “farewell” party for Uncle Tim at NY’s Village Gate: the Group Image played, Paul Krassner and Allen Ginsberg did their respective things, and the Gate’s management tossed out a tablefull of people for passing a joint around...

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

On Saturday, June 22, a demonstration expressing support for French workers and students was held in front of the office of the French consulate in the First National Building in downtown Detroit.

The demonstration, which protested the Gaullist government’s recent ban on public assembly and the suppression of French student organizations and revolutionary political parties, was jointly sponsored by the Young Socialist Alliance (Y.S.A.), the Socialist Worker’s Party (S.W.P.), the Inner City Voice, the Arab Student Association, and Black Conscience magazine.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

Other Scenesman, John Wilcock, has begun one of his frequent around the world trips. This report is filed from Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. We will publish his impressions of his visits to other European and Asian cities as they are received.

Beethoven concert in the Rector’s Palace, a centuries-old stone castle with inner patio open to the sky. Cheapest ticket 10 dinar (80 cents) with which I race up two impressive stone staircases to recline comfortably on a stone ledge overlooking the middle-aged German tourists sat stolidly in stiff-backed chairs 20 feet below.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

“In a rebellion, as in a novel, the most difficult part to invent is the end” (Alexis de Tocqueville)...

In the north of England there’s been an outbreak of bow-and-arrow “sniping”...

If the war in Vietnam was suddenly ended, says a confidential banking letter called Intercom, most of the supposed savings in military expenditures would be grabbed for other “high priority military projects deferred because of the costs of the war”. So projected tax increases, budgetary cuts, etc. would still be needed. And, of course, the military could always start another little war somewhere (Haiti? Guatemala? Bolivia? Thailand?)...

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

VENICE—Most of the art freaks who came to Venice for the June Biennale arrived in an ambivalent frame of mind. They were revolutionaries weren’t they? don’t all artists and dealers consider themselves revolutionaries?—and so they understood why the Italian students protested the Biennale as a symbol of the Italian cultural establishment. Well, didn’t they?

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes Wilcock’s London

The London Times reports sadly that Britain isn’t yet equipped to “‘retaliate quickly” against an enemy who attacks with germ warfare. As long as nationalistic feelings prevail over humanitarian ones there’ll always be this chess game with expendable lives by leaders who remain safely above it all....The U.S. Embassy has been replaced by the Hilton Hotel and the Playboy Club as top targets for stone-throwing anti-American demonstrators... A man who received a civil honor, the MBE, for “services to sport” (giving rent-free premises to an Olympic team) has been requested to return the award after being convicted (of perjury) in a court case: Establishing the principle, of course, that you’re judged by your future activities rather than your past...

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John Wilcock
Yellow Submarine Film review

LONDON The cartoon about the Beatles, “Yellow Submarine” is a watershed movie that could change the pictorial content of all movies and the style of cartoons for all time

Full of puns, (Ringo, rescued by the U.S. Cavalry after being chased by Indians, describes his adventure as “arrowing”), pictorial tricks (clouds patterned like Mexican blankets), thought-provoking jokes (vicious dog with four heads, all pulling different ways) it is a melange of all the commercial and pop art tricks of the past decade.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

By the time the narcotics squad pinpointed him last month, Dick Swafford, 28, had probably stashed two or three hundred thousand dollars away in Swiss banks. Once a week he’d leave his home in L.A. and drive to San Diego to meet the incoming grass supply from Mexico. After a bit of business in California he’d fly across country, sometimes stopping at Chicago long enough to stuff a suitcase full of shit into a parcel locker (leaving the key to the locker for his contact there to pick up later in the day.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

What a pathetic creature Horseshit Humphreak is; how could anybody with any intelligence take him seriously? Other Scenes wrote (in March 1966): “If vice-stooge HH had the guts to express his own opinions he could be the next president, which—with the polarization over Vietnam—will certainly never be his fate as a yesman.” The fact is undeniable that anybody who’s prepared to rationalize evil for any reason whatsoever is already irrevocably part of it. As of now HH Horseshit looks like a sure loser (his only helper being Asshole Agnew) which, from any revolutionary’s viewpoint, holds hope for the future. President pip-squeak humphreak could keep the wallsitters (including those deserted dreamers who worked for McCarthy) in line for a couple of years before all hell breaks loose; president vixen nixon might last a year; but with george shit-ass in power we might be lucky enough to cause the literal overthrow of the u.s. government within six months. Think on these things. Guerrillas should eschew ideologies (tho not ideals) and concentrate upon tactics.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

New York’s Film Festival proved once again how utterly impossible it is to satisfy a mixed media audience with the subjective selections of any group of film tasters. Some critics thought there was too much Godard, or too many “foreign” selections in general; others complained about the “amateurism” of the solitary American selection—Norman Mailer’s corny “Beyond the Law” or the thin content of the charming opening selection, “Capricious Summer.” Press tickets were tightly restricted and uniformed guards were alert to combat threatened disruption by militant young filmmakers who see the festival as a classic example of decadent bourgeois culture.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

NEW YORK—Norman Mailer kicked off his mayorality campaign with a rally at the Village Gate attended by George Plimpton’s party crowd and assorted dilettantes and sycophants. Targets of the evening were the NY Times, which hasn’t been giving Mailer the attention he demands; Esquire magazine whose money he’s been taking uncomplainingly for a decade; and his own audience, most of whom he correctly identified as being present “for the fun of it.”

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

A commune calling itself the Kingdom of Endor tried to plan The Great Aspen Freak Festival in the little Colorado town for this July but carelessly announced that 100,000 hippies-could be expected—and that blew the whole thing.

Suddenly the available land wasn’t available any more and threats of “vigilante” action scared off what few record company commitments that had been made. What finally brought matters to a head was a claim—untrue—that the Beatles would be coming.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

LEARY RUNS FOR GOV. Tim Leary says that he’ll conduct a “grass roots campaign for governor of California, beginning with a train tour of the state in September. He already has the support of more than 100 rock bands and “the four leading newspapers” and explains that though he won’t be participating in machine politics “there may be some smoke-filled rooms.”

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

One of the basic fundamentals of conservatism, presumably, is to conserve what you’ve got (no matter how much somebody else might need it) and to this extent at least, William Buckley, heir to a $100 million fortune, is true to conservative principles. Several hundred or thousand subscribers to Buckley’s magazine, the National Review, received a heart-rending plea in the mail last week: unless somebody gives the slick right-wing magazine $250,000 “it is quite literally true that the nation’s only conservative journal of opinion will have to close down.”

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

NEW YORK: City officials have turned down, sight unseen, a plan to turn NYC’s individual subway stations into fascinating communities, more or less reflective of the areas in which they exist.

The vast space in Greenwich Village’s West 4th Street station, for example, would be tenanted by a sort of miniature Mulberry Street festival with push carts selling vegetables, church-operated gambling wheels, an art show and second-hand bookstalls of the type found along the banks of the River Seine.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

The grass famine’s on in Mexico, too. When I was down there last week many of my friends were also bemoaning the fate of acres of the lush crop supposedly sprayed by poison and napalm. (This may be an evil rumor planted by wishful-thinking Movement purists because nobody seems to have proof of any such destruction).

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

THE ENEMY: If Hoover really did have RFK’s authorization to tap Martin Luther King’s phone why doesn’t he produce the signed memo that says so. James Bennett, director of Federal prisons for almost 30 years, has now written a book boasting about his contributions to penal reform (had you noticed how humane prisons are these days?)

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

The U.S. Post Office, which god knows has enough to do just trying to keep the mail flowing, has taken it upon itself to prejudge the contents of private letters. I got a postcard the other day inviting me to the main post office to have a letter to me (from a friend in Denmark) opened in my presence. The letter was stamped “presumed to contain obscene matter” or some such nonsense and also bore an insolent warning that if not claimed within five days “storage charges” would be made.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

Abbie Hoffman explains the reason for the grass shortage in his new book, The Woodstock World (about to be published by Random House). Federal narcs armed with hundreds of thousands of dollars went to Mexico, says Abbie, and outbid the big dope dealers for the new crop. Which they then burned and destroyed.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

Tokyo, Sept. 18

There’s no Women’s Liberation Movement in Japan—which certainly needs one—and so the 1969 Miss International Beauty Pageant went off without a hitch in the Hall of Martial Arts here last week.

The only trouble, in fact, was that things went so smoothly that even the people normally awed by these things must have been affected by the all-pervasive boredom. The nitty gritty of the affair, after all, is to display 50 girls in “national costume”, in evening gowns and in swimsuits and then pare these down to a final quintet of winners.

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

CHANGES: Hundreds of empty cans were dumped on the doorstep of Continental Can company in San Francisco by a group calling itself the Canyon League of Re-Cyclists. If the company makes money out of creating garbage it should do something about disposing of it, spokesmen explained. Continental Can officials disclaimed responsibility and had one of the protesters arrested for “littering”...

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John Wilcock
Other Scenes

SEX: Fifteen couples fucking simultaneously under the guidance of a clinical psychologist who told them how to get more out of it was one of the features at a recent encounter weekend at Ed Lange’s Elysium Institute ranch in California’s Topanga Canyon. Elysium (5436 Fernwood, L.A. Calif. 90027 for info) recently won its court fight to operate the first nudist camp within the LA city limits, overturning a law that had made nudity illegal even with your own family in your own backyard...

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