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Once again we have to extend gratitude to our subscribers for their generous contributions to insure this paper’s continued existence. Every time we thought the flow of letters containing checks or cash had ceased, we would receive yet another with an explanation that the delay was due to a wait for an unemployment check or paycheck to arrive. It’s this sort of support that provides not only the money for us to continue, but also the motivation. Some of us felt that a notice of thanks this small is insufficient to thank those that provided the funds, but really the whole paper is our response...

We’ve had the money to print and cover our expenses for August and September received from contributions and October and November will hopefully be covered by a Fifth Estate benefit/party/beer slosh to be held at Formerly Alvin’s, Friday, October 1. It will feature rock bands and free beer; see ad in this issue for details...

Access to State Police Red Squad files for 125 citizens who had dossiers kept on them has been granted, but only after the files have been thoroughly censored by a state judge presiding over the case. The 125 are people who have filed petitions with the court requesting to see the spy information, but no disposition has yet been made for the other 50,000 persons covered in the files. Attorneys for the plaintiffs say they will continue to press for full disclosure of the files and will appeal any attempt to limit access to them...

Donald Lobsinger, everybody’s favorite funny nazi and head of the right-wing Breakthrough, was convicted for the second time in early August of assaulting an anti-war priest in 1973. Lobsinger had originally been tried before “marxist” Recorder’s Court Judge Justin Ravitz, but the conviction was overturned on appeal. The higher court held that Ravitz was prejudiced against Lobsinger, since the judge had admitted a dislike for the right-winger. At the new trial visiting Judge John Kadela, sentenced the Lob to a fine of one penny and ordered him to pay court costs of $3,000 as well as probation until the money is paid off. Kadela, excusing Lobsinger’s violence as “zeal,” must know the costs will be quickly paid by rich right-wingers...

Who says crime doesn’t pay? Raymond Peterson, member of the White Killers gang, otherwise known as the police decoy program STRESS, has been awarded over $30,000 in back pay and the right to apply for a Department pension totaling 2/3 of his salary even though he was dismissed from the force two years ago after murdering a man. Peterson, who executed five people during twelve STRESS shootings, was found innocent of shooting an unarmed motorist and planting a knife on him. Peterson’s defense said that he was an “obsessional compulsive.” He remains dismissed from the force...

“Hershelf” is a small wimmin’s (as they spell it) book and craft store located at 2 Highland in Highland Park, right behind Little Read Books. They’re open Wednesday through Friday, two until seven p.m. and Sundays noon ‘til five p.m. Besides wimmin’s books they feature anti-sexist and anti-racist material as well as children’s books. Workshops and events are also being sponsored by the Hershelf. Call 869–4045 for more information...

The State Fair has rolled into town complete with amusement rides, freak shows, celebrities, farm animals, sawdust and manure. It seems to be attracting good-sized crowds in spite of recent crime scares in the city. While fairs normally generate an aura of excitement and celebration for children—if they don’t get sick—it is the paying adults who get stuck with the too-real nature of the fair-money-making. What is really galling is that beyond the $3.00 admission, it costs money for every event there, so that you pay twice for everything. While festivals and celebrations have the potential to unite different cultures and cement individual’s ties with fellow inhabitants, events like the State Fair only dramatize the distance between individuals and culture which is only bridged by cash. A society that can celebrate spontaneously with meaningful participation will be worth celebrating. The present Statist society and its mawkish gatherings complement each other well...

Community Music presents a dance, music, photography event, Local Motions, created by Karen Merline, Victoria Panella and friends. At the First Unitarian Church, located on Cass and Forest, on Sunday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m., donations of $1.50...

Also on the local music scene, Compared to What music center will present Blues great Sippie Wallace, on September 10. On September 17 they will present Sho bee do, one of Detroit’s finest bassists and on September 24 will be appearing banjo man Vince Sadowski, and favorite Bob White. Compared to What is an all-volunteer organization, presenting an informal alternative to the bar and concert music scene. For more information, contact Steve Palid at 893–0942. Doors open for performances at 8:00 p.m.